Yate

Street Map

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Yate is a town in South Gloucestershire, England, at the southwest extremity of the Cotswold Hills, 12 miles (19 km) northeast of the city of Bristol. At the 2001 census the population was 21,789. The town of Chipping Sodbury (population 5,066) is continuous with Yate to the east. Yate developed from a village into a new town in the 1960s, partly as an overspill or commuter town for the city of Bristol.

The first mention of Yate is the existence of a religious house in about AD 770; Yate is also mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086. The name is derived from the Old English word giete or gete, meaning ‘a gateway into a forest area’.

During the Anglo-Saxon period and well into medieval times, most of this part of south Gloucestershire was covered with forest. Through the centuries the land was cleared for farming.

The town’s parish church, St Mary’s, dates from Norman times. It was altered during the fifteenth century and was extensively restored in 1970. St Mary’s Primary School, situated outside the churchyard walls, was built on the site of a former poor house.

It was the opening of the railway station in 1844, as part of Bristol and Gloucester Railway, that established Yate, with Station Road becoming the central thoroughfare. The cattle and produce markets were held around this road, and businesses were established there. Yate railway station was closed by the Beeching Axe in January 1965, but was reopened in May 1989; the Brunel-built engine shed is preserved nearby.

In the 1960s Yate was designated as a development area and the building boom began. The creation of a new town included a large retail shopping area, sports and leisure development together with public buildings.

When a secondary school was built in the late 1970s, it was supposed to be called Brinsham Green School, after Brinsham Lane at nearby Yate Rocks. Owing to a spelling error, however, it was in fact called Brimsham Green School.

The town further expanded in the 1990s and 2000s with the construction of housing at North Yate. This housing estate continued to use the corrupted name of Brimsham. To locals the area is known as Brimsham Park.

During World War II, a rail transfer yard was constructed for the United States Army, probably as part of Operation Bolero to assist the build up of troops and stores before D-Day. Two large storage sheds survived on the site until 2008.

At the end of World War II, the site was taken over by the Royal Navy and became known as the Sea Transport Stores Depot. It was occupied by the Highways Agency until the sheds were demolished for development.
Oxford Archaeology has been commissioned to undertake an investigation as to the military significance of this site. The opinion of Bristol Industrial Archaeological Society has also been sought.

Note: this page is partly based on a Wikipedia page. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. Where possible, text is being updated to original, fully referenced research. ‘Our photos’ means we took the photographs. The Street View and street map visuals are courtesy of Google.

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