West Midlands

The West Midlands is an official region of England, covering the western half of the area traditionally known as the Midlands. It contains the second most populous British city, Birmingham, and the larger West Midlands conurbation, which includes the city of Wolverhampton and large towns of Dudley, Solihull, Walsall and West Bromwich. The city of Coventry is also located within the West Midlands county, but is separated from the conurbation to the west by several miles of green belt.  The region also covers predominantly rural shire counties.  Warwickshire is home to the town of Stratford upon Avon, the birthplace of playwright William Shakespeare.

The region is geographically diverse, from the urban central areas of the conurbation to the rural western counties of Shropshire and Herefordshire which border Wales. The longest river in the UK, the River Severn, traverses the region south-eastwards, flowing through the county towns of Shrewsbury and Worcester, and the Ironbridge Gorge, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as birthplace of the Industrial Revolution. Staffordshire is home to the industrialised Potteries conurbation, including the city of Stoke-on-Trent, and the Staffordshire Moorlands area, which borders the south eastern Peak District National Park near Leek. The region also encompasses five Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The highest point in the region is Black Mountain, at 703 m (2,307 ft) in west Herefordshire on the border with Wales.

The region comprises the ceremonial counties of: